ATLANTA, March 18, 2016 -- Kids II was featured in the Atlanta Business Chronicle where CHRO, Juanita Biasini, was interviewed for an article titled, “What to wear? Dress codes becoming even more relaxed at work.”

Here is a snippet from the article, written by contributing writer, Janet Jones Kendall:

"Many of the most successful companies have relaxed dress codes without any loss of efficiency, sales or negative effect on customers or clients," Hopkins said.

At Kids II, Atlanta-based infant and toddler product manufacturer, not having a formal dress code policy and allowing more relaxed attire is a way the company reflects a spirit of employee trust and empowerment, said the company’s chief human resources officer Juanita Biasini.

"We believe all of our team members are fully formed adults who have an understanding of what would be acceptable attire for work. In addition to empowering our entrepreneurial culture, we feel that by allowing our team members to express themselves by not restricting their selection of attire, is yet another avenue that fuels innovation,” Biasini said. “After all, we are making baby toys and gear, so it’s important to loosen up a little bit and have some fun."

What started years ago as casual Fridays with shorts in the summertime evolved to employees wearing shorts whenever they like, Biasini said. While some employees still opt for business casual attire, many are taking advantage of the non-dress-code policy and dressing very casually every day, Biasini said.

"Being the only toy company in an office building that’s filled with law firms and financial institutions, it's safe to say that it’s usually pretty easy to spot a Kids II team member in the building lobby," Biasini said.
Knowing your company's culture may just be the key to determining if a dress code policy can, in fact, be relaxed, according to Hopkins.

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